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Reservoir of Bespoke Ivey Abitz

Plentiful waters, plentiful bespoke Ivey Abitz garments.

This is Look 29 from the 2021 Limited Edition Collection by Ivey Abitz.

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Client Stories Stephanie in Australia

Moving to Australia in Ivey Abitz

Real Client Spotlight


From California to Australia, Ivey Abitz Makes a Huge Life Move with Stephanie


Stephanie asked us to create Ivey Abitz capsule wardrobes in different palettes for her as she made an exciting move to a different country. We were honoured and happy to assist.

We came up with several selections of layering pieces so she has the most options for mixing and matching.

Here she is, safely moving about in the world during the global pandemic, with the following garments (from her black and charcoal capsule) to keep her empowered and content on any continent:

Pictured above is Stephanie, looking lovely and ready for anything, en route to Australia. 

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Designer Notes

Remembering Kaye – An Ivey Abitz Master Tailor

We have some sad news to share with our dear clients.

Kaye, one of our longtime master tailors and friends, died peacefully in her home last week.

We know most of you were not able to officially meet her in person, but you knew her through her fine sewing. She worked for Ivey Abitz from 2009-2020, and she has sewn thousands of bespoke garments for us. If you have several Ivey Abitz garments in your closet, then you most likely have special one-of-a-kind garments that were sewn by Kaye. 

Our other dear and incredibly talented tailors have also learned from Kaye over the years, and thankfully her legacy carries on through them with their attention to detail and dedication to mastering my challenging and intricate designs. 

I will miss working with Kaye in her impressive Brooklyn sewing studio she dedicated to Ivey Abitz since 2009. I will miss her dozens of calls while she was working on projects for us from her sewing studio and I was in my design studio. Phone calls were her versions of texts and emails — she was proudly “old school.” I’d put her on speaker phone, and we’d go over things together. Our dogs know Kaye by the sound of her voice; they knew her as Auntie Kaye. She knew how to stop Artie from barking. She knew how to turn Harry’s head by singing an impromptu Broadway tune. She knew how to spread love and joy through everything she did — especially through a sewing project. 

Her sudden death has admittedly shaken me to my core, and it will take awhile to process the enormous loss. I truly loved Kaye. She wasn’t just a coworker. She was a friend. She was part of our family. I will miss her quirkiness, talent, and love. But I have to trust, just as she believed, that she isn’t gone—she’s just gone on before. She’s now with her dear dog/daughter Mandy who died in 2009. She mentioned her often, and she missed her so much. The thought of this brings a smile to my face and gives me peace. 

— Cynthia Ivey Abitz 

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photos

Eleanor’s Litmus Test

Eleanor's Litmus Test - a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt about dogs and human relationships.
Eleanor’s Litmus Test

Eleanor Roosevelt knew a thing or two about relationships.

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Designer Notes

VOTE 2020

VOTE

Eleanor votes in one of the first elections in which women had the right to vote. New York, November 3, 1936. Photograph courtesy FDR Library.
Eleanor Roosevelt votes in one of the first elections in which women had the right to vote. New York, November 3, 1936. Photograph courtesy FDR Library.

A Personal Note from Cynthia

This is a reminder to all of our clients in the United States: if you haven’t done so already in early voting, remember to vote on November 3rd.


Eleanor Roosevelt, along with her friends, worked very hard a hundred years ago so that women could have the vote in the United States. They have passed the torch on to us to make certain EVERYONE is treated with respect and equality.

Cynthia Ivey Abitz stands in line to vote in 2020.
Cynthia stands in line to vote during the pandemic, 100 years after the 19th amendment gave women the right to vote in the United States. New York, October 30, 2020. Photograph courtesy Josh Ivey Abitz.

I thought about Eleanor a lot as Josh and I stood in line together, waiting to vote in the rain and unusual autumn snow squalls yesterday here in New York. For the hour and forty minutes we were in line, there was a sense of reverence from the people waiting. Everyone was masked for the pandemic, respectful and kind while exercising their civic duty. It made me hopeful that a world can continue that honours civility and kindness—one that Eleanor reminds us will only happen if we make it so.

She once wrote, “It isn’t enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn’t enough to believe in it. One must work at it.”

An important part of the work is voting, so please remember to vote.

If you plan to wear your Ivey Abitz garments when you vote, please send us photographs of you in action. We’d love to see images of solidarity and hope as we exercise our right to vote.

— Cynthia Ivey Abitz

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Designer Notes

Client Comments about Ivey Abitz Collection no. 63

Read What Clients are Saying

Collection no. 63, c. 2020 – Sartorial Sanctuary

Ivey Abitz clients are wonderful. They are some of the kindest people we’ve ever met, and we’re so grateful for them. Oftentimes, they take the time to write us after receiving an order from us and upon a new collection debut. Here are a few excerpts of our favourites that we have recently received during the new collection, Sartorial Sanctuary. 

— I treasure my Ivey Abitz wardrobe, not only for its versatility and comfort, but also for its sturdiness, and the meticulous craft and care in its design and seamstress-work that go into each and every garment. I know this wardrobe will last me a lifetime, and my first purchases are my favorites to wear, due to the softness and ease that comes with wearing and enjoying them often. They are my Sartorial Sanctuary indeed! 

~

— It is the most stunning collection and photo shoot you have ever done! I leave my booklet out on my table so I can look at it again and again as I wait for my garments to be made. 

Look book cover from the Ivey Abitz bespoke clothing Collection no. 63 - Sartorial Sanctuary.
Cover of the Ivey Abitz Look Book for Collection no. 63, c. 2020 – Sartorial Sanctuary.

~

— Thanks for the kind note and the lovely packaging on my new capsule wardrobe, it really created a festive atmosphere. My daughter, in particular, quite admired the Fairhome Frock and the Wildefield Frock. I am wearing that very outfit now and I am throughly impressed with not only the quality of the construction of the garments but also the extreme comfort, better than sweatpants or pajamas, to my surprise.

~

— I had to take a moment and tell you how amazing you are.  I don’t know how you keep coming out with new designs, new collections, amazing fabric and combinations and just nail it collection after collection with everything going on in the world. The fabrics are so amazing and the designs are delightful and you are magic.

Meet the New Hudson Designs

~

— My dear….we both know I’ve seen a number of look-books during our time together.  However, this collection, these fabrics, your pairings are without question the most astoundingly beautiful notions I’ve seen spring from your brilliant mind.

Every photo is just…silly beautiful.  The back cover ensemble is “transportational.”

Well, well, well done you.

Ivey Abitz Look 43 from Collection no. 63 Sartorial Sanctuary. Bespoke clothing for women.
Featured on the back cover of the Collection no. 63 look book: Montmorency Wrap Jacket in Sandy Embroidered Silk Organza; Wrennie Frock in Watercolour Silk Weave; Fairholme Frock in Peony Washed Plaid Silk; Cilla Slip Frock in Peony Soft Ribbed Knit. Ivey Abitz at Boscobel House and Gardens

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Media and Press photos

Ivey Abitz Magazine Volume 2 Released

Cynthia Ivey Abitz, clothing designer, walks the beach with part of her shih tzu pack.
Cynthia Ivey Abitz, clothing designer, walks the beach with part of her shih tzu pack. Please spay and neuter your animals! As featured on the cover of Authentic Everyday, an Ivey Abitz Journal, volume 2.

 

Authentic Everyday, Volume 2, brings you together with five women who have something unique in common – they love rescuing animals and wearing Ivey Abitz clothing.

In this magazine, you’ll enjoy fine photography from Ivey Abitz as well as several other photographers. You’ll see Ivey Abitz clothing on unique women in unique settings, all of them authentic to the core.

You’ll meet dogs galore, and the Ivey Abitz cat, Camilla. You’ll see some of the faces behind the fabric and design names in the Ivey Abitz bespoke clothing collection.

You’ll meet extraordinary women. From Emmy Winning actress and radio show host Carolyn Hennesy in California, to Forbes Top Financial Advisor Nora in Texas with her horses and rescue dogs, to Lorraine in New England living her dream in an historic home with her rescued cavaliers.

Cynthia Ivey Abitz, clothing designer, walks Lake Huron with her rescue dogs.
Cynthia Ivey Abitz, clothing designer, walks Lake Huron with her rescue dogs. This image is from Authentic Everyday, Volume 2.

You’ll go on a walk with Cynthia Ivey Abitz to some of her favorite places with some of her favourite four-legged creatures.

You’ll get a glimpse of what inspires the Ivey Abitz clothing collection.

And so much more.

Read more and buy a copy of Authentic Everyday, Volume 2, here. Or get it in a set with Volume 1.

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Designer Notes

New Base Layering Frock for Summer

Limited Edition Blanchefleur Frock is a solid base layer for summer from Ivey Abitz.

Our all-time favourite Blanchefleur Frock, worn by many of our clients for over a decade now, is available this spring and summer as a limited edition frock. It features our Washed Stripe Weaves, available in Gardenia/Sand or Sun/Sand.

Learn more at the Limited Edition Blanchefleur Frock design page.

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Lauren from California Media and Press

Lauren Shields – Author of The Beauty Suit – Interviews Clothing Designer Cynthia Ivey Abitz

My artwork strives to dress that voice inside of us and let it exclaim, ‘Yes, THANK YOU. That’s the way to honour me.’

  – Cynthia Ivey Abitz

Designer Cynthia Ivey Abitz
Pictured: Cynthia Ivey Abitz amidst designs that inspire her–a favourite historic stone church and a rough-around-the-edges Grand Wagoneer.

Prologue by Lauren Shields

For the first nine months of 2011, I covered my hair, arms and legs and didn’t wear makeup or nail polish. Having been inspired by covered Muslim feminists, I called it “The Modesty Experiment,” and it was my way of distancing myself from the modern (white) feminist idea that looking hot and being strong are the same thing. (This phenomenon persists: see Olympic gymnast, and Larry Nassar accuser, Aly Raisman’s Sports Illustrated cover.)

Author Lauren Shields in some of her first Ivey Abitz clothing.
Author Lauren Shields in some of her first Ivey Abitz clothing.

After the experiment was over, I felt…bereft. I couldn’t say of what exactly, but it felt like the Beauty Suit women are socially obligated to wear—the mass-produced, tight clothing, the latest contouring palette, the revealing tops—no longer had the power it once did to bolster my sense of self.

Strangely enough, it was Facebook that helped me—or more accurately, it was their advertising algorithm. I was surfing my timeline when I scrolled past an outfit I ached to wear. That hadn’t happened in a very long time.

It was almost Victorian, but not restrictively so; classic, but not like anything I’d ever seen in real life. A dress with a kind of flowy overcoat, with rough hems, it looked like the kind of outfit one would wear in the garden, or on a quest of some sort. It was tough, well-made, but effortlessly, quirkily feminine. It was the dress I would make if I’d spent years learning how to sew. I was in love.
I clicked on the ad, possibly one of three times I have ever done so. The company was called Ivey Abitz, and the website showcased more of the same. Blouses with buttons all down the front and ties in the back, so you could accentuate your waist without having to suck in your tummy all the time. Skirts with multilayered hemlines (with pockets!). Pants, but with waistlines that were adjustable, thank God.

When I got my first check upon completion of the book I wrote about the Experiment, I fulfilled my promise to myself: I bought my first Ivey Abitz outfit. It was everything I’d wanted to wear, and I wanted to know more about what made this brand so exceptional, so different from everything else on the market.

Cynthia Ivey Abitz, whose last name is a combination of hers and her husband’s (she and her husband co-own the brand), was kind enough to talk to me about just that.

— Lauren Shields


Interview with Cynthia Ivey Abitz, Creator of Ivey Abitz Designs

by Lauren Shields

LS: How did you find your niche? How did you get started, in other words?

IA: I was wired to be an artist. Since I was a child, I’ve had ideas in my head that I had to express through creating with my hands. I was always drawing something.

Growing up, my parents used to take me to antique shops and antique shows, and through that I learned to appreciate the quality and craftsmanship of things made from other generations. I was allowed to get up close and look at antique clothing, inside and out. As I looked through garments made of incredible silks and wools, I was wearing the 70’s child “uniform” of a poly/cotton t-shirt and shorts or jeans. I always found them to be uncomfortable and uninteresting, but everyone around me was wearing something similar, and I was at an age when I thought I had to dress like everyone around me. I put the dresses I adored away to try and fit in, but it never felt right to me. Whenever I looked at antique clothing, there was always an overwhelming question of,  “Why don’t we dress like this anymore?”

During college is when I really started to answer this question for myself. As I studied fine art, I started to design clothing that I personally wanted to wear and see others wear. I started to combine glimpses of 18th century regalia with 19th century everyday garments with 1920’s relaxed silhouettes with modern day fabrics and sensibilities. I love creating a design that can’t quite be placed in one time period and making it relevant for everyday modern life.

LS: Can you give us a general overview of your clientele? Who finds you, and how?

IA: The women that wear Ivey Abitz garments really seem to know themselves. They aren’t just floating aimlessly through life — they all seem to embrace the finite amount of time they have on this earth, and they are working hard to fulfill their own personal callings. I think that is partly why they connect with the Ivey Abitz philosophy.

Many of our clients are very creative, and many make their living as visual artists, writers, actors, musicians. We create for teachers, physicians, activists, veterinarians, 911 dispatchers — there isn’t just one type of client. They are all unique, yet there is a common thread through all of them. The clients we’ve really gotten to know seem to have a wonderful mix of inner strength combined with sensitivity and kindness. They take life seriously, but they don’t take themselves too seriously, and have a sense of humour.

Ivey Abitz is found by people actively searching for clothing that speaks to them and those who are looking for an entire wardrobe change. We’re also found by people who wear Ivey Abitz and someone asks them, “Where on earth did you find this clothing?” As an artist, it’s a profound thing to see how the designs that have come from my head are now being used in practical ways in their everyday lives.

LS: What do you see as being “missing” in the market today that Ivey Abitz provides?

IA: The intricate details of my designs, their construction, their fit and drape, the choice of high quality fabrics — this combination is non-existent in mass-produced clothing.

Bespoke clothing, or garments that are made based on a person’s actual body measurements, suit our clients so they can truly be comfortable in them for everyday life. Many of our clients tell us that they feel so at home in what we create for them, and they don’t want to wear anything else now. It’s a meaningful process for our clients to have one-of-a-kind garments made just for them.

My designs come from ideals and aesthetic values that are not at all readily available in the mass market. The clothing is perhaps not for everyone because it doesn’t adhere to western culture’s ideas and trends. That is why it’s so thrilling for our clients when they discover us. My designs give women permission to be themselves and embrace who they are on the inside and out.

LS: Why are these clothes durable? Why not just make them pretty, but disposable?

IA: Ivey Abitz garments are made to be long lasting for years of wear. These are heirloom garments in that our clients value the aesthetic and quality of them enough to want to pass them down to the next generation. One client has expressed a desire to eventually give her Ivey Abitz bespoke wardrobe over to a costume institute in her city’s museum, which is a wonderful thought.
Fast-fashion companies that create disposable mass-produced clothing have a completely different purpose than we do. These massive fashion corporations are trying to make as much money as possible by making clothing as cheap as possible. They use synthetic, throwaway fabrics, made by slave labour in countries that don’t yet have strict labour laws.

I’m not a fashion designer making trends. I’m an artist that creates clothing. Our business model is one that most corporations would cringe at because it’s not really about making money. First and foremost, I am an artist, and my ideals guide everything I do. My company is creating things that last and that will be relevant for years to come.

I also want what I create as an artist to respect the earth. I want to counter the mass-produced stuff that’s being churned out with planned obsolesce and is destined for the trash. Disposable, mass-produced clothing is creating a crisis for our landfills. Much of the refuse in them consists of synthetic clothing that will not decompose. Future generations will have to deal with the mass-consumption of our culture today, and that is simply not fair to them.

LS: You and your husband run IA together, and it says on your website that you made the choice to combine your surnames when you were married in 1996. Why did you combine your names, instead of going the traditional route of taking his, or even just maintaining your own last name? Did you get any pushback from that?

IA: Yes, we did get pushback from a couple family members and friends, and we were quite surprised by it. We actually heard the argument, “The man is supposed to TAKE the wife.” When we asked what that meant, we never received a thoughtful answer. It was a knee-jerk reaction and rooted in the idea that it’s just what you’re supposed to do, and that’s that. For the most part, though, people were very supportive and loved the reasons why we did it. They were particularly impressed that Josh was willing to change his name, and I think that speaks volumes of how deep patriarchal assumptions run through our culture.

Josh and I are both called to question everything, so when it came to name changing, we both gave it a great deal of thought. We agreed early on that it didn’t feel right for me to just drop my name and take his name. Josh was empathetic and said that he’d feel sad if his name just vanished, and he wouldn’t want me to go through that either. We both didn’t agree with the patriarchal demands of the woman always being the one to change her name, and we came up with a solution that we thought was respectful to us both. We considered adding our mother’s maiden names to our last name, too. In the end, we decided on Ivey Abitz and having the same last name. We liked the sound and look of it. It suited us both, and it was meaningful to us both.

I understand that some women don’t have a family connection that they want to honour, and they look forward to a name change upon marriage. It’s a mark of a new phase in life. I only hope that people give it some serious thought before just doing what everyone else is doing and expects of them. Such contemplation and conversations help shape the relationship for the better moving forward.

LS: There is an undercurrent of self-value in the way you talk about your clothes. What do you think the difference is between your philosophy, and the idea that women’s worth comes from our ability to wear the “Beauty Suit?”

IA: When people discover the collection, we often hear, “This is the clothing I’ve been looking for my entire life, and I’ve finally found it.” Some women get very emotional about it. The aesthetics of the garments speak to them in such a visceral way. I think it’s because they sense the collection is celebrating their entire being, inside and out.

Our finite bodies, or our shells, need to be covered for practical reasons. I’m creating through these practical and needful daily items for the external to lift up the internal woman. I’m giving her tools to help celebrate everyday life and her entire self through the second skin of clothing.

This does not mean that I’m ignoring the external self. Far from it. I’m keenly sensitive to how a garment feels when it’s draped on the body. I’m a visual artist, and I communicate my ideas through texture, lines, symmetry, and hues. But I also know how important it is to acknowledge and celebrate the entire woman and not just focus on physical attributes. When I design from that place, grace and comfort coexist naturally to create the collection that is Ivey Abitz.

The definition of beauty then encompasses all of the person’s attributes, not just parts of the body that our culture currently defines as sexy. The “Beauty Suit,” or tight clothing designed to show as much as skin as possible, is one-dimensional. I believe it focuses on solely the sexuality and particular “sexual assets” of the person. The clothing essentially points arrows at what we were taught as children to be the “private parts.” This is why many believe it’s belittling to women — and men.

Having said that, some women claim to find transformation and power within such clothing trends. This is a very sensitive topic for some women, and any questioning or conversation is cast out with vehement calls of “I can wear whatever I want and you can’t tell me what to do.” I don’t want people to tell me how to dress either, and I respect that they are on a journey and are trying to figure out who they are and where they fit into our culture right now. When our culture becomes more thoughtful, it will inform and transform the clothing we choose to wear.

LS: Do you consider modesty as a concern in your design, or is it a natural extension of your vintage-inspired aesthetic?

IA: I need to deconstruct the word modesty before I can fully answer this question. The definition of modesty is “the quality or state of being unassuming.” Unassuming means “not pretentious or arrogant.” If that is the case, then yes. I’d say my designs are modest. They aren’t pretentious, and they aren’t arrogant.

I use the word modesty very carefully, though, and I usually don’t use it to describe my artwork. Our culture seems to have turned the word modesty into a shameful label and has twisted its meaning. Modesty seems to be synonymous now with covering the body out of prudishness or being afraid of one’s sexuality in some way. I’m not at all afraid of my sexuality. I also don’t feel the need to expose my cleavage and wear garments that barely cover my genital area in order to feel like a woman. Body parts do not define my value or my beauty.

I don’t describe my designs as vintage-inspired because that conjures up all sorts visual misunderstandings and more recent decades in people’s minds. I am, however, interested in historic clothing from hundreds of years ago. I like to understand design trends within their historic contexts. For example, what was really the underlying purpose of panniers, or wide gowns, in clothing back in the 1700’s? Why did men wear tights back in the 1500’s while our culture today would deem them too feminine? Clothing trends don’t just randomly come about, and there is usually a social reason for them.

LS: If “clothing has a transformative power,” what do you think is the transformative power of mass-produced clothing meant to make a woman look sexy, but perhaps not comfortable? Or is there any?

IA: We need to listen to our intuition about how to honour our entire selves. The answers are not in the TV and in magazines and the trends that are put before us. I suggest turning those off, even for just a little while, and start paying attention to our own internal compass. We’ll find that it’s quite interesting and informative.

If our shirt is so low cut and tight that we aren’t able to comfortably sit down or bend over without a breast spilling out of the neckline, if our shoes are so tall that they hurt our feet and constrict our natural movement, if our skirt is so short that we aren’t able to naturally sit down or bend over without showing our genitals, our bodies are sending signals to our brains and to our souls that this is NOT working. If something is not comfortable and literally hurts us, it is not worthy of our attention. It does not honour the external or internal self. There is something better out there for all of us.

My collection strives to be that something better for the niche that is seeking it. My artwork strives to dress that voice inside of us and let it exclaim, “Yes, THANK YOU. That’s the way to honour me.”

Since mass-produced garments have infiltrated many of our closets, our culture has been told to put up with ill-fitting garments for the sake of fitting in to trends. The message is that it’s our fault — not the clothing’s fault. Many just blame it on the so-called flaws of their own bodies and not the poor quality and cuts of the mass-produced garments. Mass-produced garments are oftentimes based upon fit models that are a size 0-2 and are 6 feet tall. Mass-produced garments are cut in stacks hundreds at a time, and sizing isn’t precise. That is why so many people have such a hard time find clothing off the rack that really fits them. Things are too long. Sleeves are too tight. There is always a pull across the chest. There never seems to be enough room across the shoulders.

Ivey Abitz clients experience something so very different. The garment designs speak to them and inspire many to exclaim they’ve found their sartorial home in our clothing collection. They love knowing that the garments are made just for them and fit them exclusively. They appreciate the comfort and ease mixed with thoughtful design. Our garments honour the uniqueness of their bodies and their entire beings, and that’s why they find Ivey Abitz bespoke so liberating.

About the author:

Shields - The Beauty Suit book cover

Lauren Shields is a writer, comedian and progressive pastor living and working in San Jose. After an article on Salon about her “year of modesty” led to calls from The Today Show and Good Morning America, Lauren wrote her first book, The Beauty Suit: How My Year of Religious Modesty Made Me a Better Feminist, published with Beacon Press. She can be found at www.laurenjshields.com.

The Beauty Suit can be purchased at independent bookstores, Amazon, and on IndieBound .

Further Reading: Cynthia Ivey Abitz shares thoughts on her reading of The Beauty Suit.

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Designer Notes Media and Press Uncategorized Videos

Ivey Abitz on the Red Carpet Emmys 2018

Emmy Winner Carolyn Hennesy wears Ivey Abitz as she hosts the Red Carpet at the 45th Daytime Emmy Awards, 2018. Carolyn’s gown was made just for her.

Carolyn’s Gown

— One hundred percent washed silk, cross-woven with rust and green threads. The weave changes hues in various lighting to look like liquid or a flowing metal. It is a silk weaving technique that was used during the Regency period for royal court gowns, though this silk is new and was woven this year.

— Handmade pin-tucking adorns the waist and handmade pleating adorns the bottom hem of the gown.

— Antique dog brooch, circa early 1900’s, is nestled inside of a hand sculpted brooch that adorns the tie in back.

— Over sixty hand sculpted floral embellishments adorn the bottom hem. Each was sculpted, then hand sewn onto the gown, taking three weeks to finish.

See more images at the Ivey Abitz website.